Photo by Nathan Dumlao

Photo by Nathan Dumlao

Remember the Golden Age of the static website? Yes, about 10 or so years ago most businesses executed the build of a “permanent” business site, but then something funny happened on the way to the glowing everlasting future: the (perhaps unexpected) need for continually updated content.

Back in 2007, nobody was talking much about content strategy and development, let alone SEO best practices. The key was to churn out enough content to fill up your website (and remember passing that task around like a hot potato?), toss in a few photos, and entrust a developer to turn all of it into magic from there. And then maybe even have a celebratory launch lunch at the office and thank the business gods that the laborious project was complete.

These days, the best business websites feature regularly updated content. And paradoxically, it is even more vital for small businesses. Let me explain. If a nationally branded soda or sneaker company misses a blog post or two one month, its name is still firmly in the group consumer consciousness. Further, people are not going for visits to huge company sites to learn about the brand; instead, they are seeking experiences.

Now contrast that user behavior with your small business. With a small company, users go to your site in a form of reverse validation; in other words, they did not find you in a web search (surprise) but are going directly to your site based on a personal interaction or thanks to word of mouth. They want to know who you are and what you think. And you do realize that they will most likely visit the site once or twice, and if the content is not refreshed, they will never visit again, right?  Why would they?

Your website is not a brochure printed once and for all but your best salesperson always full of fresh feeds and ideas. The upshot is that you need to do a lot more than check the website box on your onetime to do list. This post itself is hopefully a good example.

In fairness, there is a third group of business websites we come across here at Sumus: those formed with good intentions but then the pavement stops and the orange cones are put up. What happened?

In fact, the business did post excellent white papers, blog posts, and company updates, but they inexplicably cease in about 2014 or 2015. Since the company has most likely been doing great work for the past few years, the road block (content cessation) is hurting the brand and business.

In Hollywood, you are only as good as your last movie, and on your website, you are only as good as your last post. So maybe it is time for a content gap analysis, and more importantly, time to enter the new Golden Age: a dynamic planned and executed business site with current content all based on an editorial calendar. Please contact Sumus to find out more.

Jim Baker

Jim Baker

Sumus was founded by Jim Baker, an entrepreneur with 27 years’ experience bootstrapping and growing his business organically and through acquisition, to share his experience by providing advisory services around Board representation, Organization and Branding Strategy, Mergers & Acquisitions, Value enhancement and Exit strategy.